So on our last trip to a rocket launch we made a couple extra stops on the way home.  We were not really planning it but we were driving through Dublin and I noticed the big Dr. Pepper on the side of a building and recalled what the City of Dublin was known for.  It was home to one of the oldest bottling plants for Dr. Pepper.

It was also the only place that was bottling Dr. Pepper using real Cain Sugar!  That makes all the difference in the world.  I can’t stand Dr. Pepper how it’s normally done but I really enjoy the Dr. Pepper made with real sugar.

 

It’s ran though some REALLY HOT WATER, and cleaned very very well.  Once they are cleaned, dried, and then cooled then they would come out this end of the machine and then be moved over to the actual bottling machine.

 

 

It’s ran though some REALLY HOT WATER, and cleaned very very well.  Once they are cleaned, dried, and then cooled then they would come out this end of the machine and then be moved over to the actual bottling machine.

I wish that we had been there on a day when they actually were doing some bottling.  Our tour guide, Clay, told us how it works but I bet it would have been a great thing to see.

 

 

One the bottle is clean it heads over to this machine.  This starts by filling the bottle with the carbonated water and the syrup.  Then going over to the machine that puts on the bottle cap. Clay said that if there were any flaws in the bottle that this is where they really find out about it.

When the cap is put on there is quite a bit of pressure applied.  If there is something wrong with the bottle it pops at this point and glass and soda gets sprayed all over.  He said that it can cause people to jump like they were shot.

This is the machine that puts on the bottle caps.  They come down the little channel from the hopper on top of the machine, and then onto the bottle.

 

 

Here Clay is showing us a bottle of Dr. Pepper just after the cap is put onto the bottle.  The syrup and carbonated water are separated and it has to be mixed.  He said that before they added the last machine in the step that when the bottle came off the end of the line, they would hold the bottle by the top and then spin their arm around three times.  After that it would be mixed and would never separate again.

We asked Clay if he was planning on staying with the bottling plant forever like some employees.  He said that this was a second job to help ends meet. His real job is being a youth pastor at his local church.  I hope that he is doing well with the changes that have occurred at the plant recently.

 

 

 

 

 

 

They added the mixer (on the right) a few years back (like 40 years ago) and it mixes the two parts without anyone having to do it manually.  It spins the bottle around three times and they actually did it based on the length of someones arm.

 

 

 

What I really enjoyed hearing about was the issue of being able to tell when a bottle was capped and bottled.  They say that about a year is the most time that you should keep a bottle of Dr. Pepper.  After that it may not be as good.  Since they reuse bottles they can’t print anything on the bottle.  They could not print on the top of the cap either.

What they ended up doing was putting a magic marker in a PVC tube on a spring loaded metal rod.  When the bottle moves away from the capping machine it passes by the pen which marks the side of the bottle cap with the color of the pen.

Every thirty days they change the color of the pen.  That way, if you come across a bottle with a blue mark on the side of the cap, you will know that it was bottled in October.  Since you should only keep a bottle of Dr. Pepper for one year. You should drink the Dr. Pepper and hope you can find more.

 

Here are a few more photos that I took during the tour.  I have a few more that I can share, and I may post them at a later time.